Are They CRAZY???

Somasegar’s, Corporate Vice President, Developer Division has just announced that the first beta of Visual Studio 2005 SP1 has been released on Connect.  He says that

Visual Studio 2005 SP1 will run on Vista but will likely have a few compatibility issues.  We are working with the Vista team to understand those, to provide workarounds where possible and also work on providing you with a set of fixes beyond SP1.

So there are some issues, it’s a beta, I can live with that, but towards the end of the post was this amazing fact…

We’re also testing to ensure that your .NET Framework 1.1 and 2.0 applications will work on Windows Vista so that your existing applications will continue to run as expected. 

I’m glad to hear this, but it should go without saying, it’s the next bit that shocked me…

However, we will not support Visual Studio .NET 2002 or Visual Studio .NET 2003 as development environments on Windows Vista.  You can continue to use Visual Studio .NET 2002 or 2003 on Windows XP to develop applications that can run on Windows Vista

Are They CRAZY???  I’m all for new technology, and I spend a good proportion of my time up to my eyeball’s in beta and CTP software, but I am not the majority of MS’s developer base and to cut them from the next generation OS feels, well, crazy! 

It points to one of two things; either an attitude so caviler that they believe everyone is going to drop what they are doing and move over to Vista and .NET 2.0/3.0 or Windows Vista is so far behind the curve that Visual Studio 2003 just won’t work with the operating system, which going by what Scott Hanselman has been saying, may not be far from the truth.

I am still really excited about Vista, .NET 3.0 inparticular, it has so much potential, but damn I hope they sort this one out.

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Posted in IT. 2 Comments »

2 Responses to “Are They CRAZY???”

  1. boB Says:

    As an outsider to the world of MS, I\’m frequently frustrated by two key things.1) The ambiguous usage of the term "unsupported".  This means:
        a) We tested this.  It didn\’t work.  Making it work is a lot of effort, so you\’ll just have to live with it not working.
        b) We didn\’t have time to test this adequately because it wasn\’t written up as part of the spec, as such, it probably works, but if we say that it\’s "supported" we have to commit to spending time fixing any major bugs.  So caveat emptor!
     
    I suspect that this latest comment is an example of b. 
     
    2)  Microsoft seems to constantly be bringing out new technologies at the moment, at some speed.  New robotics stuff, the changes to the .NET framework, etc etc.  Sadly many of these are released with little thought for general usability and compatability, (there\’s only so much retraining I have time to do, and I\’m an academic!  God help the code monkeys working to strict deadlines in the world!)  More annoyingly of late is that the new robotics stuff looks kind of awesome… if they actually got round to releasing the proper tutorials I might be able to confirm this for myself, but until then I\’m not willing to bash my head against whatever weird and wonderful API they\’ve come up with.  My job regularly entails the explanation of bizzare, abstract concepts to other people.  I can tell you that the latest batch of documentation from Microsoft is amongst the most convoluted, poorly-written, buzz-word-filled techno-drivel I\’ve ever encountered in all my life!  Do you remember MS Visual Studio?  Remember the nice class diagrams and example code?  I pine for those times every week.  Now I\’ve ditched the MS .NET framework, and gone to open source.  The examples are clearer and easier to find and generally written by technical staff rather than monkeys.  Simon will testify that I\’m generally fairly pro MS, my rants about Linux are legendary, but MS is falling behind, by trying to hard to get ahead. 

  2. boB Says:

    Apologies for missing the second \’o\’ off "too" in the last sentance.  Ironic considering the subject matter of my rant 😀


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